Going to the Tate Britain

View from Lambeth Bridge

I took a day off on Friday to go to visit a few last minute exhibitions at the Tate BritainHolbein in England and the Turner Prize 2006.

The train journey up to London was peaceful and went without a hitch, unfortunately as soon as I got to Waterloo I started getting the visual disturbance that is the first symptom of a migraine. Luckily there was a pharmacy nearby which was able to dispense (usually prescription only) my migraine medication. So I carried on and decided to walk from Waterloo to the gallery to get a bit of fresh air. This was probably the best bit of my whole trip…. I walked out of the west entrance of Waterloo station towards the London eye and then past county hall and carried along the Jubilee walk and over Lambeth Bridge from where this photo was snapped.

I then got to the Tate Britain and then proceeded to have the most uncomfortable 3 hours of my recent life. Huge queue just to pick up tickets I had already ordered, the only relief was the nice American lady next to me in the ticket collection queue.  The art? Well fine enough if only I would have had an opportunity to see through the crowds and my eyes working properly. From the perspective of a stitcher I would have liked to have spent more time looking at the oil portraits detailing the costume of the times.  If there had been more time and space I would have whipped out my sketch book.  I was most fascinated by the portrait of Jane Seymour with her silver leaf “under-sleeves”.  I also found some of the gold borders on red velvet of some of the robes of Henry VIII potentially interesting for further study in goldwork.

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3 Comments

  1. I like the moody sky in this photo

  2. Anonymous says:

    What are TOBOWs? As I originate from Hampshire am I one?
    Jimjum

  3. Kitty says:

    Nope:
    T-typical
    O-old (of any age)
    B-bat
    O-of
    W-Winchester

    except some of the people were more brat like than bat like.

    You are not old, bat-like or from Winchester. Nor, could be described as typical (this is a good thing).

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